Story Sales & Service



South Dakota Ag News Headlines
Corn-fermented protein in weaned pig diets - A study review
South Dakota Ag Connection - 11/30/2023

Corn-fermented protein (CFP), derived from bioethanol production, shows promise as a high-quality ingredient in weaned pig diets. It has been found to have higher digestibility and metabolizable energy content than traditional feeds like distiller's dried grains with solubles (DDGS) and corn products.

Rich in essential amino acids like lysine and methionine, CFP can comprise up to 50% protein and 25% yeast, offering notable benefits due to its fermentation process, including improved protein and energy digestibility and reduced crude fiber levels.

Research from the University of Illinois indicates that CFP surpasses soybean meal in crude protein and amino acid content. This led to the development of a study at South Dakota State University, aiming to assess if CFP could effectively replace soy protein concentrate in weaned pig diets without affecting growth performance and gut integrity.

In this study, newly weaned pigs were assigned to different diets with varying levels of CFP. The trial was conducted over three phases, examining average daily gain (ADG), average daily feed intake (ADFI), and gain-to-feed ratio (G: F). Gut integrity was assessed using a differential sugar absorption test (DSAT).

The results showed that pigs fed diets with 4% and 8% CFP during the initial phase had comparable growth performance to those fed soy protein concentrate. However, a higher inclusion rate of 12% CFP resulted in lower growth rates. No significant differences were observed in gut permeability among the groups.

The study suggests that incorporating CFP into weaned pig diets can effectively replace soy protein concentrate, enhancing feed intake without negatively impacting growth performance. Given CFP's lower cost compared to soy protein concentrate, its use could lead to reduced feed costs in pig farming.


Other South Dakota Headlines
Hixwood Metal
Professional Dairy Producers Foundation
Copyright © 2024 - Farms.com. All Rights Reserved.